Baked Kale Loaf I generally don’t follow recipes and tend to use whatever is in the press or fridge. Today I wanted a light loaf without the usual nuts and beans that go into vegetarian meatless loaves. So, here’s today’s version … Ingredients: 500 grams of kale 1 shallot 1 carrot 4 large mushrooms 4… Read More


Chickweed: Stellaria media Chickweed is available most of the year but I love to gather it in early Spring. It is a tiny sprawling plant with white star-like flowers and easily overlooked. I use it in salads, juice it and sometimes steam it. It makes a good pesto as it has a slightly salty taste.… Read More


Ramsoms: Wild Garlic Wild garlic, also known as ramsoms or creamh in Irish, (Allium ursinum) are the most common variety of wild garlic found in Ireland. You will find them in woodland areas, alongside streams and wet ditches in early Spring. They have similar properties to cultivated garlic, they benefit the heart and blood circulation,… Read More


Plant-based proteins Proteins account for about 20% of our body weight, they help to build body tissues, enzymes, immune cells and are involved in all functions of the body. Protein needs decrease with age, excessive amounts burdens the kidneys and can reduce bone density. Proteins from legumes, seeds, nuts and pseudo-grains should account for about… Read More


Sprouting grains, seeds and pulses Sprouting is an easy and economical way to add vitamins, minerals and digestive enzymes to your diet. Sprouting increases vitamin content by up to 700% and provides a rich source of antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic proteins, minerals and vitamins. Alfalfa sprouts are high in vitamins A, B, C, E and K,… Read More


Essential Fatty Acids: Omega 3 & 6 The human body is capable of producing all the fatty acids it requires except for two: omega-3 fatty acid and omega-6 fatty acid. For this reason, Omega-3 and 6 are termed: Essential fatty acids (EFAs), because they need to be obtained from our diet. Omega 3 fatty acids are… Read More


Dietary Fibre There are two types of dietary fibre: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fibre dissolves as it is digested. It absorbs fluids, which can delay stomach emptying and relieve diarrhoea, stabilise blood sugars, regulate cholesterol and sustain energy. Oats and psyllium seed husks are high in soluble fibre. Chia seeds are among the richest sources… Read More


Whole Grains: flours Whole unprocessed grains contain all three edible parts: the germ, endosperm and bran of the original grain seed or kernel. The bran is the outer skin of the kernel. It contains important antioxidants, B vitamins and fibre. The germ is the embryo and it has the potential to sprout into a new… Read More


Sugar: some alternatives Sugar has no nutritional value and is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream. It produces a rush that triggers the pancreas to try and re-balance sugar-levels in the blood. Too much sugar over-activates the pancreas, absorbs calcium from your bones and teeth that later gets deposited in your muscles, arteries, joints and major… Read More


3 Vital healthy habits for improved health The word vital stems from the Latin vitalis (–of life) and refers to that which is essential and necessary to the maintenance of life. Air: Practice deep-breathing From our first breath to our last, air is absolutely essential to life. If you live in a busy built-up area,… Read More