Dietary Fibre There are two types of dietary fibre: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fibre dissolves as it is digested. It absorbs fluids, which can delay stomach emptying and relieve diarrhoea, stabilise blood sugars, regulate cholesterol and sustain energy. Oats and psyllium seed husks are high in soluble fibre. Chia seeds are among the richest sources… Read More


Whole Grains: flours Whole unprocessed grains contain all three edible parts: the germ, endosperm and bran of the original grain seed or kernel. The bran is the outer skin of the kernel. It contains important antioxidants, B vitamins and fibre. The germ is the embryo and it has the potential to sprout into a new… Read More


Sugar: some alternatives Sugar has no nutritional value and is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream. It produces a rush that triggers the pancreas to try and re-balance sugar-levels in the blood. Too much sugar over-activates the pancreas, absorbs calcium from your bones and teeth that later gets deposited in your muscles, arteries, joints and major… Read More


3 Vital small changes for improved health The word vital stems from the Latin vitalis (–of life) and refers to that which is essential and necessary to the maintenance of life. Air: Practice deep-breathing From our first breath to our last, air is absolutely essential to life. If you live in a busy built-up area,… Read More


Nourish and flourish A healthy diet is fundamental to a healthy body. The abundance of contradictory research on what constitutes a healthy diet can be confusing, and being told that what was good for us yesterday is bad for us today can numb us on the whole subject of diet. Fad diets and food trends… Read More


How can I get enough iron if I don’t eat meat? There are two types of iron in food: Haem iron found in animal tissue, and non-haem iron found in plant foods. Iron nutrition depends on the amount of iron consumed and the amount absorbed. While the body more readily absorbs haem iron this is… Read More